Measuring Web Performance and the Health of the Public Internet

Date: 
Wednesday, September 24, 2003 - 17:30
Location: 
TH 331
Presenter: 
Eric Siegel Keynote Systems
Abstract: 
The Internet and the Web have become crucial to the economy and to our society;therefore, government, the press, andindustry all want instantaneous and trending measures of the Internet's health and of the performance of the Web as seen by end-users. This talk will first cover the measurements that the various groups want, and the reasons that they want those particular measurements (regulation, Service Level Agreements, diagnosis, etc.). We'll then discuss the tools being used (emulation tools, synthetic transaction, P2P, server-side sniffing, etc.), the problems in obtaining the measurements (locations, privacy/security concerns, etc.), and some statistical considerations. The talk will conclude with a discussion of the evolving industry approaches to measurement and some of the problems that are appearing.
Bio: 

Eric Siegel, Principal Internet Consultant with Keynote Systems, has been a member of the Internet community since 1978. He is the author of "Designing Quality of Service Solutions for the Enterprise" (John Wiley & Sons) and "Practical Service Level Management: Delivering High-Quality Web-Based Services" (with John McConnell, Cisco Press, forthcoming). He is also an instructor in Internet performance and QoS at major industry conferences such as Networld+Interop. Before joining Keynote, Mr. Siegel was a Senior Network Analyst at NetReference, Inc., where he specialized in network architectural design for Fortune 100 companies, and he was a Senior Network Architect with Tandem Computers, where he was the technical leader and coordinator for all of Tandem's data communications specialists worldwide. Mr. Siegel also worked for Network Strategies, Inc. and for the MITRE Corporation, where he specialized in computer network design and performance evaluation. Mr. Siegel received his B.S. and M.E.E. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Cornell University, where he was elected to the Electrical Engineering honor society.