A timbre-aware interactive computer music system

Date: 
Wednesday, October 27, 2004 - 17:30
Location: 
TH 331
Presenter: 
William Hsu
Abstract: 
Interactive computer music systems analyze the performance of a human musician in real-time, and generate material adaptively to accompany or improvise with the human musician. Most existing systems work with high-level performance events, such as note on and off, pitch, and loudness. Timbral information, which may be a crucial component of an improviser's musical language, is generally ignored. We are developing a system that is able to parse both timbral and gestural information from a real-time performance. It extracts features that may be important to a human improviser when guiding a response or developing a dialogue. In addition to pitch or loudness, we also use timbral characteristics such as brightness, pitch/noise content, roughness, inharmonicity, etc. This information will be used to guide real-time audio processing and/or material generation. (This is a collaborative project with British saxophonist John Butcher.)
Bio: 

Bill Hsu is an associate professor of computer science at San Francisco State University. His research interests include computer music, computer architecture and performance evaluation.